Research

Analysing the Wellbeing Budget

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Date: 
Monday, June 10, 2019
Location: 
Victoria University of Wellington

Wellbeing budgetThe Government's first Wellbeing Budget has generated considerable discussion, both nationally and internationally. But is this shift in narrative matched by a shift in the substance of the budget? What more needs to be done to focus government decision-making on the things that really matter to New Zealanders?

This IGPS event will bring together a variety of perspectives on the 2019 Budget with a panel discussion featuring:

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Poor productivity hurts living standards

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Date: 
Fri, 07/06/2019

Research released today by the Productivity Commission highlights the cost of New Zealand’s poor productivity performance.

Productivity by the numbersNew Zealand’s labour productivity growth has underperformed for decades and has fallen further in the 10 years since the Global Financial Crisis. Between 2008 and 2018, labour productivity growth in the measured sector averaged just 1.0%, down from 1.4% since 1996.

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The tax-benefit interface

Publication type: 
Research paper
Author: 
Dr Patrick Nolan
Publication date: 
Fri, 01/02/2019

This article discusses the interaction of the tax and benefit systems (the tax–benefit interface). It shows profiles of combined taxation and benefit abatement (effective marginal tax rate profiles) for two families, before discussing lessons that could be drawn from these profiles for policy. One theme that emerges is the need for simplification. Yet rather than pursuing simplification through grands projets, such as a universal basic income, what is needed is a focus on detailed design issues, such as how tightly programmes respond to fluctuations in hours of work and incomes.

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Innovation in primary healthcare

Publication type: 
Research paper
Author: 
Sandra Moore
Publication date: 
Fri, 01/02/2019

Health systems everywhere are facing significant challenges – demand pressures from an ageing population, a rise in chronic health conditions, and greater community expectations as more new health treatments are developed. There are three possible responses to this: increasing health funding (increasing inputs), rationing health services (restricting outputs) or increasing productivity through innovation (doing things differently and more efficiently).

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Assessing and enhancing New Zealand's productivity

Publication type: 
Research paper
Author: 
New Zealand Productivity Commission, Australian Productivity Commission, OECD, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, and Victoria University of Wellington
Publication date: 
Wed, 01/08/2018

 

Policy Quarterly: Volume 14 – Issue 3 – August 2018

A special productivity issue of Policy Quarterly, guest edited by Dr Patrick Nolan from the New Zealand Productivity Commission.

It includes contributions from the New Zealand Productivity Commission, Australian Productivity Commission, OECD, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, and Victoria University of Wellington and covers the following topics:

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Growing the digital economy in Australia and New Zealand

Publication type: 
Research paper
Author: 
Australian and New Zealand Productivity Commissions
Publication date: 
Thu, 14/02/2019

This joint Australian and New Zealand report looks at the broad challenges and opportunities created by the digital economy and at what institutional and regulatory settings by the Australian and New Zealand Governments would be most effective. It identifies new opportunities for trans-Tasman collaboration in the delivery of trans-Tasman financial services, digital identity frameworks, streamlined digital trade processes and other areas.

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Firm dynamics and job creation: revisiting the perpetual motion machine

Publication type: 
Research paper
Number: 
2019/1
Author: 
John Stephenson
Publication date: 
Thu, 14/02/2019

This paper presents analyses of firm dynamics in New Zealand. The purpose of the analysis is to revisit the findings of Meehan and Zheng (2015), to see if firm dynamics have changed since that study.

The dynamics of “digital” firms have also been investigated – firms in industries that produce digital and communications technologies or support their use by other firms and consumers, or produce and sell digital content and media. 

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Productivity in developed Asia-Pacific and Turkey: A firm-level perspective

Publication type: 
Research paper
Author: 
Australian Dept. of Industry and Science, Japan Productivity Center, New Zealand Productivity Commission, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey
Publication date: 
Mon, 24/12/2018

Although productivity is one of the deciding factors for firm’s performance, research on this topic is hampered by the scarcity of firm-level data and lack of streamlined methods to perform cross-country analysis. This report introduces the Productivity Research Network dataset and methodology, which address the aforementioned problems. It focuses on Asia-Pacific countries and Turkey, with some comparisons made with developing Asia and EU region. 

A Note on Construction Worker Migration to New Zealand 1962-2018

Publication type: 
Research paper
Author: 
Andrew Coleman; Özer Karagedikli
Publication date: 
Wed, 14/11/2018

This paper constructs a long time series of permanent and long-term arrivals and departures of construction workers to and from New Zealand between 1962 and 2018. It briefly describes the data and the sources, then discusses key observations in the data.

Getting under the hood: Insights from Recent Firm-level Productivity Research in New Zealand

Publication type: 
Research paper
Author: 
Productivity Commission, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE), Statistics New Zealand, and the Treasury.
Publication date: 
Thu, 05/07/2018
JEL Codes: 
D2; J2; J3; J6

This note summarises insights from recent research on New Zealand's productivity performance using firm-level data. Coverage is largely limited to research completed since 2013 and that uses the Longitudinal Business Database, although a small number of older studies or studies that use different data are included where they help illustrate important findings. The structure is as follows: