Tertiary education

New models of tertiary education - Issues paper

Publication type: 
Inquiry report
Publication date: 
Wed, 24/02/2016

The issues paper outlines some questions the inquiry will consider over the next 12 months, describes the tertiary education system and trends influencing it, and seeks submissions to help the Commission develop its advice and recommendations. The Commission will then meet with a wide range of stakeholders to gather information and feedback in order to prepare the draft report by September.

Employment skills: Filling the gaps in tertiary education

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Author/Presenter: 
Dave Heatley, Principal Advisor
Date: 
Fri, 26/02/2016

A version of this article was originally published in the National Business Review.

Around the country, thousands of students are embarking on tertiary study, hoping their qualifications will lead to rewarding jobs that use their newly-acquired skills.

More New Zealanders than ever have some form of tertiary qualification and employers need skilled workers. So with some careful matchmaking, everyone should be happy.

Yet employers report hard-to-fill vacancies, most often because applicants lack the necessary skills or qualifications.

Studying the future of tertiary education

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Date: 
Wed, 24/02/2016

The Productivity Commission has released an issues paper calling for input on the future of tertiary education.

“The pursuit of knowledge and learning is of critical importance to any society,” said Murray Sherwin, Chair of the Productivity Commission.

“Tertiary education delivers a wide range of benefits for individuals and the community. People with higher qualifications are happier and healthier, they are more likely to vote and volunteer in their communities, and of course they have the opportunity to earn more over their lifetime.  

History of tertiary education reforms in New Zealand

Publication type: 
Working paper
Number: 
RN 2016/1
Author: 
Ron Crawford
Publication date: 
Tue, 12/01/2016
JEL Codes: 

This research note was written as a background paper for the New Models of Tertiary Education inquiry. It briefly describes successive reforms to the New Zealand tertiary education system over the last 28 years and draws out some lessons that are likely to remain current into the future. It identifies the main motivations for reforms, how the reforms played out in practice, and how policy makers made adjustments in response.

New models of tertiary education

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Intro blurb: 
What will the future of tertiary education look like?
Inquiry Number: 
11
Our brief
Completed

24 Feb: Issues paper now available.

The Government has asked the Productivity Commission to investigate how trends in technology, internationalisation, population, tuition costs and demand for skills may drive changes in models of tertiary education.

The inquiry follows on from the 2014 Innovations in Tertiary Education Delivery Summit, which considered emerging models of tertiary education provision and discussed challenges to shifting away from traditional models. The inquiry will consider how New Zealand’s institutional and policy settings help or hinder the adoption of new models of tertiary education, as well as looking broadly across what new models there are or what might emerge.

The final report to Government is due on 28 February 2017.

Media release: New inquiry: New models of tertiary education

12 Jan: History of tertiary education reforms in New Zealand

This research note was written as a background paper for the New Models of Tertiary Education inquiry. It briefly describes successive reforms to the New Zealand tertiary education system over the last 28 years and draws out some lessons that are likely to remain current into the future. It identifies the main motivations for reforms, how the reforms played out in practice, and how policy makers made adjustments in response. This paper does not represent the views of the Productivity Commission and is made available for background only.

Quick link for this inquiry: www.productivity.govt.nz/inquiry-content/tertiary-education

Issues paper
Completed

The issues paper outlines some questions the inquiry will consider over the next 12 months, describes the tertiary education system and trends influencing it, and seeks submissions to help the Commission develop its advice and recommendations. The Commission will then meet with a wide range of stakeholders to gather information and feedback in order to prepare the draft report by September.

Submitters can download a Word document listing all the questions from this Issues Paper, and use it as the basis of their submission if they wish.

Make a submission

Register your interest

The Commission seeks your assistance in gathering ideas, opinions and information to ensure the inquiry is well-informed and relevant. We will keep registered participants informed as the inquiry progresses via email updates at key stages in the inquiry process.

Register your interest.

Due date for initial submissions: 4 May 2016
Release of draft report: September 2016
Draft report submissions due: November 2016
Final report to Government: 28 February 2017

12 Jan: History of tertiary education reforms in New Zealand

This research note was written as a background paper for the New models of tertiary education inquiry. It briefly describes successive reforms to the New Zealand tertiary education system over the last 28 years and draws out some lessons that are likely to remain current into the future. It identifies the main motivations for reforms, how the reforms played out in practice, and how policy makers made adjustments in response. This paper does not represent the views of the Productivity Commission and is made available for background only.

Quick link for this inquiry: www.productivity.govt.nz/inquiry-content/tertiary-education

Draft Report
Completed

The Commission's draft report New models of tertiary education is now available.

The terms of reference for this inquiry invite the Commission to examine how well New Zealand's tertiary education system is set up to respond to, and take advantage of, trends in technology, internationalisation, population, tuition costs and demand for skills. The Commission was also asked to identify potential barriers to innovation.

Download individual chapters of the report.

Inquiry timeline

29 September 2016: Draft report released for consultation
21 November 2016: Submissions close
February 2017: Final report due to Government

Subscribe to receive regular updates

Inquiry contacts

Administrative matters
T: 04 903 5167
E: info@productivity.govt.nz
 

Judy Kavanagh, Inquiry Director
T: 04 903 5165
E: judy.kavanagh@productivity.govt.nz

 

Final report
Completed

The Productivity Commission has completed its inquiry into New models of tertiary education.

The report is a broad-ranging inquiry into how well New Zealand’s tertiary education system is set up to respond to emerging trends in technology and the internationalisation of education, and changes in the structure of the population, and the skills needed in the economy and society. As part of the inquiry, the Commission was asked to identify potential barriers to innovation.

The Commission has made a number of recommendations including better quality control and self-accreditation for strong performers; making it easier for students to transfer between courses; abolishing University Entrance; better careers education for young people; enabling tertiary institutions to own and control their assets; making it easier for new providers to enter the system; and facilitating more and faster innovation by tertiary education providers.

Media release: New models of tertiary education are coming, ready or not

Download individual chapters of report

New inquiry: New models of tertiary education

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Date: 
Tue, 03/11/2015

The Government has asked the Productivity Commission to investigate how trends in technology, internationalisation, population, tuition costs and demand for skills may drive changes in models of tertiary education.

The inquiry follows on from the 2014 Innovations in Tertiary Education Delivery Summit, which considered emerging models of tertiary education provision and discussed challenges to shifting away from traditional models. The inquiry will consider how New Zealand’s institutional and policy settings help or hinder the adoption of new models of tertiary education, as well as looking broadly across what new models there are or what might emerge.